Dihydromyricetin (DHM) is a flavonoid with liver-protective (hepatoprotective) properties. It originated from Hovenia Dulcis, which is a well-known Japanese raisin tree. Since its discovery in the year 659, this flavonoid has been a go-to hangover remedy in Japan, China, and Korea. 

However, it wasn’t until Jing Liang, an associate professor at the UCLA School of Medicine, researched that it started to take notice of the wonders of this flavonoid. The study includes rats who consumed DHM while intoxicated in 2012 and found that there was actual science supporting the ingredient [1].

This article will explore the benefits of DHM or dihydromyricetin and its side effects.

Dihydromyricetin as a Supplement

Many Asian countries have used dihydromyricetin (DHM) as a dietary supplement as it improves alcohol absorption. Take note, though, that if taking DHM alone (in its pure and extracted form), some of its benefits will be lost, including the biologically active chemicals for liver-protective properties.

Here are the qualities to look for when considering taking dihydromyricetin as a supplement. 

1. Synergistic Ingredients

When choosing a DHM supplement, it’s best to select a supplement that has dihydromyricetin and also other ingredients contained in a raisin tree extract. This is because the raisin tree extract does not only contain DHM but other ingredients that may also help with reducing the effects of alcohol.

However, taking a sufficient dose of DHM may still help in nursing a hangover, so a supplement containing raisin tree extract isn’t a must. One containing pure DHM can still be effective.

2. Forms

DHM comes in a variety of forms. Powders, beverages, liquid extracts, capsules, and chewable are the most popular forms in the market. Whichever you decide, be sure that you select the most convenient and all-natural, without added fillers.

Dihydromyricetin Benefits and Uses

The Hovenia Dulcis extract DHM in studies has shown that it reduces and prevents various symptoms connected to alcohol consumption, making it an “alcohol antidote.” Some of these symptoms include alcohol withdrawal and hangovers. Some studies even suggest that it helps lower the risk of drunkenness [2].

Although it is frequently used as a supplement to ease the effects of alcohol withdrawal and hangovers, this kind of supplement has many other potential uses.

Let’s explore some science-backed health benefits of DHM.

1. Hangover

Dihydromyricetin is the only product now on the market that can prevent hangovers, according to research. DHM is frequently used to treat hangover symptoms such as nausea, headaches, dizziness, vomiting, and tiredness.

Here are some ways that DHM stops hangovers:

Stops Acetaldehyde from Forming

When the body breaks down alcohol, acetaldehyde starts to build up. It is thought that this exceedingly lethal compound is 20 to 30 times more dangerous than alcohol alone. In fact, acetaldehyde is attributed to most typical hangover symptoms, such as headaches, nausea, and hypersensitivity.

The supplement dihydromyricetin enhances the liver’s capacity to break down acetaldehyde more quickly. There will be less of it in your body when you wake up after a night of excessive drinking. Consequently, the extent of your hangover symptoms will be minimized [3].

Reduces Minor Alcohol Withdrawal

When long-term alcoholics try to stop drinking, they go through unpleasant withdrawals. Even if you only drink occasionally, you experience mild alcohol withdrawal every time you sober up.

Dihydromyricetin lessens the symptoms of minor alcohol withdrawal. It affects the brain’s GABA receptors, causing them to return to their baseline faster. By doing so, typical hangover symptoms like anxiety, confusion, and lack of sleep are eliminated [4].

2. Weight Loss

According to a study conducted in diet-induced obese (DIO) mice, DHM decreases body weight, lowers white adipose tissue (WAT) mass, improves lipid and glucose metabolic abnormalities, and lessens hepatic steatosis (fatty liver disease) [5].

Vine tea is highly effective in lowering body weight caused by the Western diet and improving cholesterol buildup in the liver, according to earlier studies [6 7]. The flavonoid in vine tea with the highest bioactivity is DHM. According to some studies, DHM has anti-inflammatory, anti-oxidative stress, and anticancer properties [8 9 10].

According to the present study, DHM can treat DIO mice’s metabolic problems related to glucose and lipids and help them lose weight [5].

Dihydromyricetin Side Effects

It’s interesting to note that relatively few DHM side effects have been documented when looking at published research papers. Overall, just a little research has examined the side effect profile of DHM, and thus far, no negative issues have been reported.

Remember that with so few studies examining this topic, it can be challenging to draw firm conclusions about DHM and its side effects. Some possible side effects that DHM could bring about include the following:-

  • Dizziness
  • Trouble sleeping
  • Dry mouth
  • Headache
  • Upset stomach

Is Dihydromyricetin Safe?

Toxicity tests of dihydromyricetin were tested in mice, and the result showed that injecting 1.4grams of DHM per kilogram of the mouse’s body weight can cause death to half of the test subjects population.

It is safe to assume that the estimated human equivalent dose (HED) ratio that is considered safe for humans is 16% when using mice to human dosage conversion. For instance, this gives a DHM dosage of its upper safe limit of 15.68g for a 70kg person.

As long as you follow the dosage recommendations given by the company or by your physician, DHM is generally safe for healthy adults and poses a low risk of severe side effects.

Dihydromyricetin Dosage

Although it requires some thought, determining how much DHM to administer is simple. Dihydromyricetin is taken for two major purposes, each requiring a somewhat different dosage. Since conversion from rat models is unreliable, the recommendations below are only based on an anecdotal study.

  • To reduce drunkenness before drinking: 2g+
  • To avoid a hangover after a drink: 100 mg per drink (where one drink generally equates to two units)

Bottomline: Dihydromyricetin Benefits, Side Effects, & Dosage

DHM is a supplement that has undergone a reasonable amount of research and an active component that is backed by a wealth of scientific research for a range of health-improving properties. DHM may emerge as one of the most popular components on the market as research on it advances and the market for it expands. 

Disclaimer: This article is only a guide. It does not substitute the advice given by your healthcare professional. Before making any health-related decision, consult your healthcare professional.

Editorial References And Fact-Checking 

  • Shen Y, Lindemeyer AK, Gonzalez C, Shao XM, Spigelman I, Olsen RW, Liang J. Dihydromyricetin as a novel anti-alcohol intoxication medication. J Neurosci. 2012 Jan 4;32(1):390-401. doi: 10.1523/JNEUROSCI.4639-11.2012. PMID: 22219299; PMCID: PMC3292407.
  • Shen Y, Lindemeyer AK, Gonzalez C, Shao XM, Spigelman I, Olsen RW, Liang J. Dihydromyricetin as a novel anti-alcohol intoxication medication. J Neurosci. 2012 Jan 4;32(1):390-401. doi: 10.1523/JNEUROSCI.4639-11.2012. PMID: 22219299; PMCID: PMC3292407.
  • Chen SH, Zhong GS, Li AL, Li SH, Wu LK. [Influence of Hovenia dulcis on alcohol concentration in blood and activity of alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) of animals after drinking]. Zhongguo Zhong Yao Za Zhi. 2006 Jul;31(13):1094-6. Chinese. PMID: 17048612.
  • Ji Y, Li J, Yang P. [Effects of fruits of Hovenia dulcis Thunb on acute alcohol toxicity in mice]. Zhong Yao Cai. 2001 Feb;24(2):126-8. Chinese. PMID: 11402730.
  • Leng, Q. (2022, June 11). Dihydromyricetin ameliorates diet-induced obesity and promotes browning of white adipose tissue by upregulating IRF4/PGC-1α – Nutrition & Metabolism. BioMed Central. https://nutritionandmetabolism.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s12986-022-00672-6
  • Xie K, He X, Chen K, Sakao K, Hou DX. Ameliorative effects and molecular mechanisms of vine tea on western diet-induced NAFLD. Food Funct. 2020 Jul 1;11(7):5976-5991. doi: 10.1039/d0fo00795a. Epub 2020 Jul 15. PMID: 32666969.
  • Xiang J, Lv Q, Yi F, Song Y, Le L, Jiang B, Xu L, Xiao P. Dietary Supplementation of Vine Tea Ameliorates Glucose and Lipid Metabolic Disorder via Akt Signaling Pathway in Diabetic Rats. Molecules. 2019 May 15;24(10):1866. doi: 10.3390/molecules24101866. PMID: 31096578; PMCID: PMC6571802.
  • Hou XL, Tong Q, Wang WQ, Shi CY, Xiong W, Chen J, Liu X, Fang JG. Suppression of Inflammatory Responses by Dihydromyricetin, a Flavonoid from Ampelopsis grossedentata, via Inhibiting the Activation of NF-κB and MAPK Signaling Pathways. J Nat Prod. 2015 Jul 24;78(7):1689-96. doi: 10.1021/acs.jnatprod.5b00275. Epub 2015 Jul 14. PMID: 26171689.
  • Jiang B, Le L, Pan H, Hu K, Xu L, Xiao P. Dihydromyricetin ameliorates the oxidative stress response induced by methylglyoxal via the AMPK/GLUT4 signaling pathway in PC12 cells. Brain Res Bull. 2014 Oct;109:117-26. doi: 10.1016/j.brainresbull.2014.10.010. Epub 2014 Oct 27. PMID: 25451453.
  • Zhang Q, Liu J, Liu B, Xia J, Chen N, Chen X, Cao Y, Zhang C, Lu C, Li M, Zhu R. Dihydromyricetin promotes hepatocellular carcinoma regression via a p53 activation-dependent mechanism. Sci Rep. 2014 Apr 10;4:4628. doi: 10.1038/srep04628. PMID: 24717393; PMCID: PMC3982169.
maca coffee 2
Charish Luzuriaga, RDN

Charish is a Registered Nutritionist-Dietitian (RDN) who really enjoys helping her readers understand their dietary habits better. She has impressive experience and knowledge about the nutritional values of various foods and ingredients and enjoys informing her readers about popular diets, supplements, and herbs. Charish harnesses her nutritional expertise to inspire and empower people to make positive, healthy changes through what they eat (and drink!). LinkedIn

Author

  • Charish is a Registered Nutritionist-Dietitian (RDN) who really enjoys helping her readers understand their dietary habits better. She has impressive experience and knowledge about the nutritional values of various foods and ingredients and enjoys informing her readers about popular diets, supplements, and herbs. Charish harnesses her nutritional expertise to inspire and empower people to make positive, healthy changes through what they eat (and drink!). LinkedIn

Share.

Charish is a Registered Nutritionist-Dietitian (RDN) who really enjoys helping her readers understand their dietary habits better. She has impressive experience and knowledge about the nutritional values of various foods and ingredients and enjoys informing her readers about popular diets, supplements, and herbs. Charish harnesses her nutritional expertise to inspire and empower people to make positive, healthy changes through what they eat (and drink!). LinkedIn