Fenugreek tea can help you produce more breast milk, control blood sugar, and boost testosterone levels. There may also be other health benefits, but this needs more research to confirm.

It has a long history of use in complementary and alternative medicine. In traditional Indian cooking, it functions both as an ingredient and a popular dietary supplement.

This plant is likely associated with a wide variety of positive health effects.

The advantages of using fenugreek tea, as well as its potential drawbacks and practical applications, are discussed in this article.

What is Fenugreek?

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The fenugreek plant, also known as Trigonella foenum-graecum, can reach a height of up to 3 feet in its mature state (60 and 90 centimeters). It bears seed-bearing pods that are golden brown in color and are accompanied by green leaves and tiny white flowers [1].

It has been used for treating skin conditions and various other diseases in traditional Chinese medicine and alternative medical practices for thousands of years [1].

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In addition to its use as a seasoning and a thickener in the kitchen and other parts of the home, it is also present in a great many other products, such as shampoo and bar soap.

The nutritional profile and flavor profile of fenugreek seeds and powder are also utilized in various Indian dishes. The flavor profile is described as slightly sweet and nutty.

Nutrition Facts

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Whole fenugreek seeds contain 35 calories and a variety of nutrients, including the following when consumed in an amount of 11 grams (g) [2]:

  • Carbs: 6 gm
  • Fat: 1 gm
  • Protein: 3 gm
  • Fiber: 3 gm
  • Manganese: 6% DV (of the Daily Value)
  • Magnesium: 5% DV
  • Iron: 21% DV

May Aid in Managing Blood Sugar and Diabetes

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Fenugreek may help with metabolic disorders like diabetes [3].

One study found that type 2 diabetics who took fenugreek seed powder containing 5 grams twice daily for a period of two months experienced a reduction in their hemoglobin A1c, fasting blood sugar levels, body mass index, and abdominal fat, which indicates sustained success in managing blood sugar [4].

Due to their high fiber content, Fenugreek powder or seeds may help support blood sugar control, even in people who do not have diabetes.

Indeed, one study found that in people who did not have diabetes, the amount of sugar in the blood after a meal was significantly reduced when the amount of refined wheat flour in buns and flatbreads was reduced by 10% and replaced with fenugreek powder [5].

May Boosts Male Testosterone Levels

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Supplemental fenugreek is commonly used by men to increase testosterone levels.

According to the findings of several studies, it has a number of beneficial effects, including an increase in libido.

Men who took 300 mg of fenugreek twice daily for eight weeks saw a significant rise in testosterone. This was coupled with strength-building exercises [6].

The participants experienced a reduction in body fat without experiencing a corresponding decrease in muscle strength compared to the control group [6].

In an older study that lasted for six weeks, thirty male participants were given a supplement that included magnesium, zinc, and vitamin B6 in addition to 600 milligrams of fenugreek extract. The majority of participants noted improvements in their strength as well as their sexual function [7].

Effects on The Production of Breast Milk

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Breast milk is the most beneficial nutrition source for your child’s growth and development. On the other hand, some people require assistance in producing sufficient quantities.

Fenugreek may be a natural and risk-free alternative to the prescription drugs that are commonly used to increase the amount of breast milk a woman produces. Research in this area is ongoing.

An older study with 78 new mothers found that those who drank herbal tea with fenugreek seeds produced more breast milk, which helped their infants gain weight. The study lasted 14 days [8].

In another study from 2011, 66 mothers were split into three different groups. The fenugreek tea was given to one participant, the placebo was given to another, and the third participant received nothing [9].

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In these studies, fenugreek herbal tea was used rather than supplements; however, it is likely that the effects of the supplements would have been comparable.

Although this research is encouraging, you should talk to a trained medical professional about your concerns regarding breast milk production.

Other Fenugreek Tea Health Benefits

Fenugreek has been found to be effective in treating a variety of conditions. However, additional research and testing are required to arrive at conclusive findings for most of these applications.

According to the results of some preliminary studies, fenugreek might help:

Inflammation

  • This herb has been shown to have anti-inflammatory effects in rodent models, specifically rats, and mice. To verify this, we need to conduct research on humans [10,11].

Heartburn

  • Fenugreek was found to be effective in relieving symptoms of frequent heartburn in participants of an older pilot study that lasted for two weeks. In point of fact, its effects were exactly the same as those of antacid medications [12].

Cholesterol levels

  • There is some evidence that consuming fenugreek tea can bring about a reduction in both cholesterol and triglyceride levels [13].

Appetite control

  • There is evidence from some studies that consumption of fat and appetite both decrease. The participants in the study naturally cut their total fat consumption by 17% over the course of the study’s 14 days [14,15,16].

In addition, research conducted within the realm of traditional medicine and anecdotal evidence, suggests that fenugreek may be useful in improving metabolic function, reducing the severity of digestive problems, and treating various other conditions [17].

How To Use Fenugreek

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Ingredients in supplements frequently include fenugreek. The recommended dosage varies depending on the supplement because different supplements have different formulations. There is not a single dosage that is recommended.

The typical dosage of fenugreek extract used in studies on testosterone ranges from 250 mg to 600 mg, while the typical dosage used in studies on milk production is between 1 and 6 grams [18,19].

In some other fields of study, researchers have used significantly higher doses. In fact, scientific research on fenugreek’s effects on lowering cholesterol and blood sugar levels suggests that doses between 5 and 25 grams may be the most effective [20].

In most cases, supplements should be consumed before or after a meal. Because it helps to regulate blood sugar, taking this herb at the meal of the day that contains the most carbohydrates may be the most beneficial way to use it.

Follow the label’s recommended dosage exactly at all times. If you are unsure, you should speak with a healthcare professional.

Fenugreek Tea Side Effects

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Fenugreek is considered to be risk-free for the vast majority of people [21]. As with most dietary supplements, people have reported less serious side effects, such as diarrhea and indigestion.

A loss of appetite is another potential side effect, which can be problematic for individuals who already struggle with eating disorders or are trying to gain weight [14,15].

In addition, some people who take supplements say they smell strange and slightly sweet after they use them, although this has not been verified.

Because of its impact on glucose levels, fenugreek ought to be utilized with extreme caution by anyone who is currently taking diabetes medication or any other supplements that can bring glucose levels down.

According to research conducted on animals, extremely high doses can cause various undesirable effects, such as a reduction in fertility, damage to the genetic material, an increased risk of miscarriage, and neurological problems [22].

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Some scientists are worried about taking fenugreek supplements because of the potential for negative side effects, even though most of these have not been confirmed in humans. This is because the dosages that are typically taken are exceptionally high.

It is always best practice to speak with a qualified medical professional before using a new dietary supplement. Make it your number one priority to check that your dose is appropriate.

Bottomline

Fenugreek tea is an uncommon herb that has been used for numerous years in complementary and alternative medicine.

It has been shown to lower blood sugar levels, increases testosterone levels, and increase milk production in nursing mothers, according to the evidence that is currently available.

Fenugreek tea may help control appetite in addition to lowering cholesterol levels and reducing inflammation; however, more research is needed in these areas. Fenugreek tea may also help lower cholesterol levels.

FAQs

You can drink fenugreek tea up to three times a day. It may work well in combination with other breastfeeding herbs, like blessed thistle, fennel, and alfalfa.
Make sure not to take fenugreek together with other herbal/health supplements that can also affect blood clotting. This includes dong quai, clove, danshen, capsicum, ginger, garlic, horse chestnut, ginkgo, poplar, red clover, panax ginseng, saw palmetto, turmeric, and willow.
It was traditionally used for diabetes and to increase milk supply in breastfeeding women. Nowadays, it is promoted as a dietary supplement for diabetes, menstrual cramps, and other conditions and to stimulate milk production during breastfeeding.

Disclaimer: This article is only a guide. It does not substitute the advice given by your healthcare professional. Before making any health-related decision, consult your healthcare professional.

Editorial References And Fact-Checking

  1. Ahmad, A., Alghamdi, S. S., Mahmood, K., & Afzal, M. (2016). Fenugreek a multipurpose crop: Potentialities and improvements. Saudi journal of biological sciences, 23(2), 300–310. https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/27307778/
  2. FoodData Central. (n.d.). FoodData Central. https://fdc.nal.usda.gov/fdc-app.html#/food-details/171324/nutrients
  3. Gaddam, A., Galla, C., Thummisetti, S., Marikanty, R. K., Palanisamy, U. D., & Rao, P. V. (2015). Role of Fenugreek in the prevention of type 2 diabetes mellitus in prediabetes. Journal of diabetes and metabolic disorders, 14, 74. https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/26436069/
  4. Hassani, S. S., Fallahi Arezodar, F., Esmaeili, S. S., & Gholami-Fesharaki, M. (2019). Effect of Fenugreek Use on Fasting Blood Glucose, Glycosylated Hemoglobin, Body Mass Index, Waist Circumference, Blood Pressure and Quality of Life in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus: A Randomized, Double-Blinded, Placebo-Controlled Clinical Trials. Galen medical journal, 8, e1432. https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/34466512/
  5. Robert, S. D., Ismail, A. A., & Rosli, W. I. (2016). Reduction of postprandial blood glucose in healthy subjects by buns and flatbreads incorporated with fenugreek seed powder. European journal of nutrition, 55(7), 2275–2280. https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/26358163/
  6. Wankhede, S., Mohan, V., & Thakurdesai, P. (2016). Beneficial effects of fenugreek glycoside supplementation in male subjects during resistance training: A randomized controlled pilot study. Journal of sport and health science, 5(2), 176–182. https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/30356905/
  7. Steels, E., Rao, A., & Vitetta, L. (2011). Physiological aspects of male libido enhanced by standardized Trigonella foenum-graecum extract and mineral formulation. Phytotherapy research : PTR, 25(9), 1294–1300. https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/21312304/
  8. Ghasemi, V., Kheirkhah, M., & Vahedi, M. (2015). The Effect of Herbal Tea Containing Fenugreek Seed on the Signs of Breast Milk Sufficiency in Iranian Girl Infants. Iranian Red Crescent medical journal, 17(8), e21848. https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/26430522/
  9. Turkyılmaz, C., Onal, E., Hirfanoglu, I. M., Turan, O., Koç, E., Ergenekon, E., & Atalay, Y. (2011). The effect of galactagogue herbal tea on breast milk production and short-term catch-up of birth weight in the first week of life. Journal of alternative and complementary medicine (New York, N.Y.), 17(2), 139–142. https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/21261516/
  10. G, S., G L, S., Pushpan, C. K., Nambisan, B., & A, H. (2018). Evaluation of anti-arthritic potential of Trigonella foenum graecum L. (Fenugreek) mucilage against rheumatoid arthritis. Prostaglandins & other lipid mediators, 138, 48–53. https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/30107253/
  11. Zhou, C., Qin, Y., Chen, R., Gao, F., Zhang, J., & Lu, F. (2020). Fenugreek attenuates obesity-induced inflammation and improves insulin resistance through downregulation of iRhom2/TACE. Life sciences, 258, 118222. https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/32768577/
  12. DiSilvestro, R. A., Verbruggen, M. A., & Offutt, E. J. (2011). Anti-heartburn effects of a fenugreek fiber product. Phytotherapy research : PTR, 25(1), 88–91. https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/20623611/
  13. Askarpour, M., Alami, F., Campbell, M. S., Venkatakrishnan, K., Hadi, A., & Ghaedi, E. (2020). Effect of fenugreek supplementation on blood lipids and body weight: A systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials. Journal of ethnopharmacology, 253, 112538. https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/32087319/
  14. Bae, J., Kim, J., Choue, R., & Lim, H. (2015). Fennel (Foeniculum vulgare) and Fenugreek (Trigonella foenum-graecum) Tea Drinking Suppresses Subjective Short-term Appetite in Overweight Women. Clinical nutrition research, 4(3), 168–174. https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/26251835/
  15. Robert, S. D., Ismail, A. A., & Wan Rosli, W. I. (2014). Trigonella foenum-graecum seeds lowers postprandial blood glucose in overweight and obese individuals. Journal of nutrition and metabolism, 2014, 964873. https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/25276421/
  16. Chevassus, H., Molinier, N., Costa, F., Galtier, F., Renard, E., & Petit, P. (2009). A fenugreek seed extract selectively reduces spontaneous fat consumption in healthy volunteers. European journal of clinical pharmacology, 65(12), 1175–1178. https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/19809809/
  17. Bahmani, M., Shirzad, H., Mirhosseini, M., Mesripour, A., & Rafieian-Kopaei, M. (2016). A Review on Ethnobotanical and Therapeutic Uses of Fenugreek (Trigonella foenum-graceum L). Journal of evidence-based complementary & alternative medicine, 21(1), 53–62. https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/25922446/
  18. Mansoori, A., Hosseini, S., Zilaee, M., Hormoznejad, R., & Fathi, M. (2020). Effect of fenugreek extract supplement on testosterone levels in male: A meta-analysis of clinical trials. Phytotherapy research : PTR, 34(7), 1550–1555. https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/32048383/
  19. Drugs and Lactation Database (LactMed®) [Internet]. Bethesda (MD): National Institute of Child Health and Human Development; 2006-. Fenugreek. [Updated 2022 Aug 15]. Available from: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK501779/
  20. Askarpour, M., Alami, F., Campbell, M. S., Venkatakrishnan, K., Hadi, A., & Ghaedi, E. (2020). Effect of fenugreek supplementation on blood lipids and body weight: A systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials. Journal of ethnopharmacology, 253, 112538. https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/32087319/
  21. Fenugreek. (n.d.). NCCIH. https://www.nccih.nih.gov/health/fenugreek
  22. Ouzir, M., El Bairi, K., & Amzazi, S. (2016). Toxicological properties of fenugreek (Trigonella foenum graecum). Food and chemical toxicology : an international journal published for the British Industrial Biological Research Association, 96, 145–154. https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/27498339/
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Dr Faisal Rasheed, M.D.

Dr Faisal is a certified Medical Doctor currently carrying the role of a Senior Medical Officer in the Orthopaedic Surgery Department of his local hospital. With his vast experience and knowledge in the medical field, Dr Faisal is well-equipped to share educational content that helps readers improve their health and wellness. During his hospital shifts, he diligently cares for and treats patients under him. And during his spare time, he enjoys crafting health and wellness content that inspires readers to make positive changes. LinkedIn

Author

  • Dr Faisal is a certified Medical Doctor currently carrying the role of a Senior Medical Officer in the Orthopaedic Surgery Department of his local hospital. With his vast experience and knowledge in the medical field, Dr Faisal is well-equipped to share educational content that helps readers improve their health and wellness. During his hospital shifts, he diligently cares for and treats patients under him. And during his spare time, he enjoys crafting health and wellness content that inspires readers to make positive changes. LinkedIn

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Dr Faisal is a certified Medical Doctor currently carrying the role of a Senior Medical Officer in the Orthopaedic Surgery Department of his local hospital. With his vast experience and knowledge in the medical field, Dr Faisal is well-equipped to share educational content that helps readers improve their health and wellness. During his hospital shifts, he diligently cares for and treats patients under him. And during his spare time, he enjoys crafting health and wellness content that inspires readers to make positive changes. LinkedIn